Reviews
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"Linda Overman’s Letters Between Us is a clever, intricate, powerful novel, a tale of girls gone wild amidst the sex, drugs, rock ‘n’ roll of the Sixties and of the women they become. The story of Katharine and Laura—electrified with the possibilities of youth, grounded in the accommodations of adulthood, charged with the irony and tragedy—would be hard to forget even if simply told. But Overman is an artist, brave and skilled enough to put the pen in her characters’ hands and let them write their own story of hope and disappointment, passion and desire. That makes Letters unforgettable."
David Bradley, Author of SOUTH STREET and THE CHANEYSVILLE INCIDENT

"Cutting edge. A rarity. In an era of male "buddy" sagas, a story of a deeply tender relationship between two women--only one of which is a survivor--in a time and place hard to navigate: late 20th century America. Their strong voices, both tough and tender, gutsy and sweet, compel us to listen. Read this book."
Eve La Salle Caram, Award winning novelist, Senior Instructor in Fiction Writing, The Writers' Program, UCLA Extension

"Letters Between Us is a powerful story of search for self, identity, of losing a friend and finding her in a deeper sense, and through her, making discoveries and gaining insights. Overman grips you with intimate, startling details so that you can’t stop reading until you have reached the last page."
Nahid Rachlin, Author of PERSIAN GIRLS and JUMPING OVER FIRE

"Poignant and remarkable storytelling of lost friendships, family, and innocence. A rich narrative of coming of age in Los Angeles in the 70's while tackling generational differences, cultures and rediscovering life's regrets, hopes, tribulations, and pleasures."
Mariana Galvez, Director of Media & Marketing, Emmy Award Winning Series 24

"Letters Between Us is one of those books that leaves you sitting quietly and contemplatively after you are
done reading it. Initially, all that I could say about the novel was, “Wow.” This is definitely one of the most
realistic fictional stories that I have ever read . . .
Linda Rader Overman has such a talent with words. . . Part of me feels like I just finished watching a
movie, instead of having read a book. This novel is about looking back and contemplating life, not death."

Paige Lovitt for READERVIEWS.COM

"A sentimental journey down a Boomer memory lane lined with funhouse mirrors that contort “Who were we, really?” and “Who are we now?,” Letters Between Us conveys the power and poignancy of the unspoken on intimate relationships. I could almost hear “Eleanor Rigby” as I turned the pages.."
Morgan Hunt, Award-Winning Author, TESS CAMILLO MYSTERIES

"After Katharine's memorial service, plagued by anger and guilt, confusion and disillusionment,
Laura exiles herself to a beachfront cottage to sort things out. Utilizing the excavation of some
twenty years of correspondence, photographs and memorabilia - two lives crammed into simple
cardboard boxes - author Linda Rader Overman compels the reader to join Laura on a poignant,
yet sometimes disturbing and irreverent journey of remembrance, rediscovery and revelation.
No matter how close you become, do you ever truly know another's heart? Do you ever truly
know your own?"

Sharon Cupp Pennington, Author of HOODOO MONEY

"Letters Between Us, centers on the emotional growth of a woman as she deals with the loss of her long-time friend and, while reading letters from the past, discovering her friend’s hidden secrets and her own inadequacies. Ms. Overman nailed the many voices of the two friends as they grew from innocent children into troubled adults. Kit’s and Laura’s story quickly involves the reader and provides an emotional ride that will not soon be forgotten."
Dianne Gerber Award winning Romantic-suspense author, 2007 PYHIAB ST WINNER

Letters Between Us” begins at the end, with a Santa Barbara Herald newspaper article chronicling the death of 39-year-old Katharine Taylor Fields whose body was found in a dumpster at the Cold Spring Tavern Inn.  Katharine’s friend, Laura Wells, learns of the death through Katharine’s estranged husband David.  Katharine had been a patient at the Santa Barbara Psychiatric hospital for the past eight months, had just disappeared, and then was found dead.  After attending the memorial services, Laura visit’s David’s house and he gives her “a brown cardboard box with some of Katharine’s mementos from childhood.” (p. 19) Read more . . . 
Kam Aures for RebeccasReads.com. Reprinted in Entertainment Blog in Reuters.com

This is a meticulous account, in the form of letters and diaries, of two sixteen-year-old girl friends who were teens in the seventies. Recently Katharine, age 39, has been found dead in a dumpster after wondering off from a picnic. She had been a patient in a Psychiatric Hospital for a number of months. Her friend Laura attends the funeral. During the after burial reception Laura is given a box of old letters and diaries belonging to Katharine. Laura spends days poring over the contents of this box. She relives, in her mind, her childhood and teenage years spent in the company of Katharine, their parents and all that the girls shared in their young lives.
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Gunta Krasts Voutyras for Bestsellersworld.com.

Letters Between Us is an epistolary novel covering the lives of two friends. Katherine is found dead mysteriously and Laura, a writer is much saddened by it and tries to find why and how Katherine died. Laura starts reading the letters they sent to each other since they started their friendship. She tries to keep the letters in some chronological order so that she can make some sense into those.
From those letters, we can see their past in which they shared so much-friendship love, pain and so much more.

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Gautami Tripathy Everything Distils into Reading

Linda Rader Overman is a true craftsman of the art of fine storytelling. Every once in a while, you read a book that moves you so much that it sticks in your head; well I have to tell you that Letters Between Us is one of those books. Though it was a terrible tragedy what happened to Katherine, the one thing that Katherine had that most people would envy is a wonderful best friend in Laura. This is the first book I have read by Linda and I hope to read more by this author.
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Cheryl's Book Nook

This is a story told through letters between two women. From 1963 to 1989 they are friends, keeping diaries and writing letters, sharing everything through three decades of growth and change. The book begins with the loss of one of them, Katherine, tragically. Her friend Laura comes into possession of all their correspondence in a box that Katharine had kept, along with her diaries. Katharine had problems her friends and family could not seem to share or understand and the details of her death are baffling to everyone.
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Fresh Ink Books

When Katharine Taylor's body is found in a dumpster her best friend, Laura Wells, decides to retrace their friendship. She desperately wants to understand how her friend went from an academic over achiever in high school to the sad, mentally ill shell of a woman that she and Katharine's family laid to rest.
The story is told through notes, letters and Laura's journal entries. I loved this format for the book. . .
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Janel's Jumble

The beginning of this novel actually commences at the end. Could anyone have changed that? Laura is trying to cope with her mother who is struggling with Alzheimer’s disease when out of the blue her friend’s husband, David, rings to say his wife Katherine has died. Katherine had written to her on a regular basis from the hospital but conversations over the phone always consisted of Katherine saying she was the devil and needed to die. Laura thought she had understood and talked her out of doing this but sitting at the church during the funeral she wondered how it had all actually ended for Katherine. Laura also wondered why David had wanted a separation. Katherine certainly didn’t.

After the funeral, David asked Laura to go into Katherine’s bedroom and there she found boxes of letters from herself to Katherine from the age of twelve years up to the present day. . .
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Jessica Roberts Bookpleasures.com

Letters Between Us takes us into the lives of two friends, Laura and Katharie. As an eight grade student, Katharine a shy girl attempts a clumsy, brave move at a friendship with Laura by writing her a note. Over the years the two will exchange frequent letters, the subject matter maturing as the years pass. Those letters are shared with the reader after Katharine's death. Laura sequesters herself in a hotel room bringing along two boxes of correspondence; hers and Katharine which she picked up at her deceased friends home. Her wish, to match the letters, date by date, and hope for a pattern to emerge which would perhaps shine some light on her friend's useless death. Along with this story we become intimate with both Laura and Katherine's families. Laura, who's father abandoned her mother early on, Katharine's dad who might or not have molested her as a child, alcholic her dad never held a job letting his wife finance their lives. For those who like a tense ending, the author of this book will not disappoint you. For me I am still wondering "Could it be that...."

No Spoiler here, you will have to read this book. I gave it 4 stars even so I was tempted to give it 5. I'll be waiting for Linda Rader Overman's second novel. This is her first book and it had me hooked from beginning to end.
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Sylvie Madeleine Sevigny Madeleine's Book Blog

Many years ago I had the pleasure of watching a stage production of Helen Hanff’s fine book 84 Charing Cross Road, a story that chronicles a long distance friendship via mail over a two decade long period. Letters Between Us is written along similar lines. The story involves the relationship between two friends from childhood, Laura Wells and Katharine Taylor Fields. Following the sudden death of Katharine, Laura heads out on an odyssey of self discovery. Both women were Pack Rats, keeping all of their correspondence all the way back to grade school.

While visiting Katherine’s husband David, Laura manages to borrow Katherine’s stash of letters and other assorted notes. She asks her husband to messenger over her own stash of saved correspondence.   While holed up in a hotel in Santa Barbara replays their long time friendship through her own treasure trove of letters, the borrowed ones, and her own memory.
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Simon Barrett Blogger News Network

‘Letters between Us’ opens with the death of 40 year old Katharine who was a patient in a mental asylum. It is assumed she has committed suicide. When Laura her childhood friend goes to her funeral, she is full of questions. She wants to understand why was Katharine was compelled to take this step. Her husband David whom she has never liked much gives her Katharine’s old box full of letters, old photographs and some journal entries.

As Laura goes through the box and reads each letter and each journal entry she unravels Katharine’s life and her secrets. When she looks at all the memories with an adult’s perspective she finally reads between the lines and understands what Katharine was going through right from her childhood.

The book starts off really well. I wanted to know what Laura would find in all the letters and photographs. Would she find a mystery? Or would she find why Katharine died? But all the letters contained was how Laura was so involved in drugs and boys and experimenting with things. For a while I really started to wonder where all this was leading to.
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Violet Crush

Santa Barbara Herald
Friday July 7, 1989
Missing Mother Found Dead in Dumpster

That's the opening page of Letters Between Us. And although it reads like real life, it is a fascinating work of fiction.

Laura and Katherine were friends from grade eight through to the death of Katherine at age 39. They faithfully kept in touch over the years with letters. When Laura goes to the funeral, she is given a box of letters and photos to go through by Katherine's estranged husband. Laura asks her husband to send the box of letters she has saved to her. She holes up in a motel rereading and reliving not just Fields' life but her own.

The book is a mixture of Laura's reminiscences and correspondence between the women, with letters faithfully reproduced. Bolder type is used for Laura's correspondence and faded, tiny script for Katharine's. Although I believe this script mimics what Katharine's type and style of writing would be like, I found it a bit hard to read. It is interspersed with Laura's journal entries from 1989 and memories of their lives together.
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A Bookworm's World

This book is thought-provoking and a testament to the strength in friendship. It also shows how little we can know a person despite thinking that we're privy to their lives. Laura and Katharine are very different right from the start but despite, or perhaps because, of this, they become each other's best friend. I loved the format of this book, with the little diary entries by Laura as she's reading through everything and mourning the loss of a best friend. And then the little letters that were exchanged between Katharine and Laura. With Katharine especially, her early letters already gave indication to something below the surface and I know how Laura feels when she realizes how many subtle hints were there.
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Carmen Alexis' Book Talk

. . . "Letters Between Us" is an engaging, easy-to-read novel, written in a unique form. The book is about a friendship that has grown since they were teenagers. Makes you wonder if a friendship like that can stand the test of time. Did you keep any letters or notes from friends when you were that age?
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Cindy's Love of Books

“Letters Between Us” by Linda Rader Overman is an emotional roller-coaster story of two women and their lives. From the start of Laura and Kitty’s friendship in 8th grade in the 60’s to Kitty’s death at age 39 from mental illness, this story is one of ups, downs and self-discovery. The setting is Los Angeles in the 60’s thru 80’s and both girls were from low middle-class dysfunctional families. Both were different in looks and temperament. . .
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J. Kaye's Book Blog